Clock Number 11

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Each clock I have made has been designed as I go  and number 11 is no exception. It is an excellent example of the propensity wood turners have to change design in mid stream because the original idea simply didn’t work. As you will see, I have turned a disaster into an opportunity and am actually happier with the results than I would otherwise have been because skeleton clocks demand maximum visibility through the movement.

The horological component, that is to say the movement itself, has been simplified to the maximum extent possible with a simple hours and minutes display. While it is possible I will include additional hands in the next clock, this one will remain a simple time piece.

After a lot of trial and error that started about ten years ago, I have made two changes to the electronics in the switch and am now happy that that element of the design is mature.

The software that controls the chip has also been ungraded. The previous programs were written in PIC basic pro by a friend in the US. In order to further enhance the accuracy Clinton, my oldest son, has written a program (accessed through an Excel Spreadsheet) in machine language which will allow a higher level of accuracy in the programming of the IC which controls coil activation.

I have also refined the control of the drive shaft of the clock and it is now quieter and easier to adjust.

 

This is the base that the clock is built on. It was turned as a shallow hollow form a number of years ago from Jarrah. The highlight is Camphor a highly featured timber classified as a weed in a number of Australian states.
This is a hollow form turned from Jacaranda. The original idea was to carve most of the timber away to form a framework into which the clock movement could be mounted.
The carving process begins. I have done this type of work in Jarrah many times. In order for it to work the remaining carved form needed to be at least as structurally strong as Jarrah but sadly it is not. It quickly became apparent that carving a shell of Jacaranda to a wall thickness of 5 or 6 mm was not practical because the now dry timber was too brittle. It was time to revise the design.
IMG_1883Instead of a timber frame I opted for 13/32 inch brass tubes.
IMG_1906 Reshaped top back to the lathe.
The construction of the case is compete.IMG_1887
IMG_1896 I think it is square!

 

.IMG_1894..Bits and pieces…
IMG_1888..The process of gold plating starts.
IMG_1845 Gold finish Ok. I give myself a beginners pass.
.IMG_1863 Dial parts complete.
.IMG_1862  Perspex by hand. Time to make a jig.
IMG_1860 Winding the coil on my woodlathe.
..IMG_1861 Coil complete.
IMG_1855 Making a lantern pinion.
.img_1931 Clock 11 Front elevation
img_1933 Side elevation features gold plated  coil cover.
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